Carolina Hurricanes sign forward Ryan Dzingel for two years at $3.375 million per year

Carolina Hurricanes sign forward Ryan Dzingel for two years at $3.375 million per year

On Friday, the Hurricanes announced that the team had signed forward Ryan Dzingel to a two-year contract for $3.375 million per year. I will add details to my initial thoughts/comments on Twitter from Friday morning.   Good signing in terms of price vs. value vs. risk 1/? Really good signing by #Canes. Price/risk/caliber of player math is incredibly good for proven middle 6 player. #TakeWarning https://t.co/BlHgo9P1mn — Canes and Coffee (@CanesandCoffee) July 12, 2019 At the simplest level, the signing is a solid non-flashy signing. In Ryan Dzingel, the Hurricanes added a proven middle 6 forward who is coming off a strong season with 26 goals and 56 points. A bit like Erik Haula, Dzingel is another capable forward who at a minimum is above the third line replacement level offensively. Also like Haula (if he recovers to 100 percent after leg injury), Dzingel is another player who is a perfect fit for Brind’Amour’s style that emphasizes pace, pressure and forechecking. Dzingel can fly and naturally plays and aggressive style of hockey. He naturally slots at left wing but could also play on the right side if needed. On a financial level, one has to like this deal. He adds another player with two-term and a reasonable $3.4 million that is the going rate for good third-line forwards in today’s NHL. Dzingel offers upside from a third-line salary as evidenced by his 2018-19 offensive production. The two-year term pegs the risk at an absolute minimum. And the lack of any no-trade/no-movement clauses maximizes flexibility going forward.   Another component for building a second scoring line 2/? Ryan Dzingel is...
Thoughts on the Sebastian Aho offer sheet

Thoughts on the Sebastian Aho offer sheet

Today an NHL rarity occurred, and it involved the Carolina Hurricanes. A few hours into the kick off of NHL free agency, it was announced that the Montreal Canadiens had signed Sebastian Aho to an offer sheet. The headline terms were a five-year deal at $8.454 million per year. But the headline numbers do not tell the whole story. Breakdown of Aho offer sheet: $11.3M SB plus 700k salary in Year 1; $9.87M SB plus 700k salary in Year 2; $6.95 SB plus 750k salary in Year 3; $5.25 SB plus $750k in each of Year 4 and Year 5 — Pierre LeBrun (@PierreVLeBrun) July 1, 2019 The situation is interesting on many levels. Let’s step through at least most of them.   An odd move by the Canadiens By pegging the salary where it is, the Canadiens would have to give up first, second and third round draft picks. Had they gone a bit higher another first round pick would have been added. In that regard, the salary offered looks like a steal for the Canadiens, but that only matters if the Hurricanes do not match it. There are issues with the payment structure (see below), but I would be utterly shocked to see the Hurricanes not match this. So that begs the question of what Montreal was up to. Did they really think that there is a chance that the Hurricanes would decide not to match this fairly modest offer in return for a ‘meh’ set of draft picks? Or did Montreal perhaps just see an easy chance to stick it to another Eastern Conference team? Montreal...
Carolina Hurricanes trade Scott Darling to Florida for goalie James Reimer

Carolina Hurricanes trade Scott Darling to Florida for goalie James Reimer

The same will not likely be true for free agency, but the Carolina Hurricanes have staked a legitimate claim for being the #1 mover and shaker in the trade market in the week between the 2019 NHL draft and the start of free agency on July 1. Not counting trading down in the draft twice, the Hurricanes have now made four trades this week. Sunday’s entry was yet another that had a huge financial angle to it. Rather than buying out Scott Darling, the Hurricanes managed to deal him to Florida (who then bought him out) with a sixth round draft pick for goalie James Reimer.   The financials which again rule the deal This will be the third out of the four deals that are primarily about the math and dollars. Scott Darling was not going to play again in the Hurricanes organization, so had this deal not happened, it most certainly would have been the Hurricanes buying him out. The cost in actual dollars of buying him out would have been $1.183 million for for years with a slightly higher salary cap hit spread oddly over the same four years. So the total cost would have been $4.73 million. Instead the Hurricanes added James Reimer who is due $3.1 million per year for each of the next two years for $6.2 million total. In essence, measured in actual dollars the Hurricanes added about $1.4 million in cost, but in the process added a goalie who can actually slot into the lineup. The one wild card is that Reimer has a lockout-shielded contract that pays him $2.25 million...

Quick thoughts on Anton Forsberg and Gustav Forsling from John Jaeckel at The-Rink.com in Chicago

Yesterday, I posted detailed thoughts on Monday’s trade that sent Calvin de Haan and Alekski Saarela to the Chicago Blackhawks for goalie Anton Forsberg and defenseman Gustav Forsling. If you missed it, you can find that HERE. John Jaeckel who is the Chicago Blackhawks Head Writer and Podcast Co-Host for The-Rink.com was kind enough to share his insight on Forsling and Forsberg.   John Jaeckel’s thoughts on Anton Forsberg and Gustav Forsling Canes and Coffee: What do you see as Gustav Forsling’s strengths and weaknesses as an NHL defenseman? In what type of role could you see him thriving? In what type of role might he be in over his head? John Jaeckel: Good skater, very good point shot, pretty physically willing for his size. Tended to overhandle the puck in his end when he first came up—often with disastrous consequences. Seems behind his man a lot yet he is mobile, so it appears his issues are often positioning-related. He has physical ability, needs more time and perhaps a new coaching voice.   Canes and Coffee: How would you assess Forsling in terms of being a capable NHL power play player? John Jaeckel: Possible, but more of a shooter (he can blast it) than an innate QB/setup guy.   Canes and Coffee: Do you have any thoughts on how Forsling’s skill set might or might not fit with Trevor van Riemsdyk on a third pairing? John Jaeckel: TVR, with his relative skills, could be a decent complement to Forsling.   Canes and Coffee: How would you evaluate Anton Forsberg in terms of being a capable NHL backup? John Jaeckel: That...
Hurricanes trade Calvin de Haan and Aleksi Saarela to Blackhawks for Anton Forsberg and Gustav Forsling

Hurricanes trade Calvin de Haan and Aleksi Saarela to Blackhawks for Anton Forsberg and Gustav Forsling

On Monday night, it was announced that the Carolina Hurricanes had traded Calvin de Haan and AHL level prospect Aleksi Saarela to the Chicago Blackhawks for goalie Anton Forsberg and defenseman Gustav Forsling. I offered my Twitter-sized thoughts shortly after the deal the was announced and will add a layer or two of detail to them below.   First and foremost a financial move 1/? More than anything this is a financial restructuring deal. At some point, team needed to cut some salary on blue line. #TakeWarning https://t.co/yNcd5AM8vR — Canes and Coffee (@CanesandCoffee) June 25, 2019 The crux of this deal is making a move to take a step toward restructuring the team’s salary costs. My best guess has always been that the original plan last summer was to trade both Justin Faulk and Jeff Skinner last summer. The moves to add both Calvin de Haan and Dougie Hamilton in my opinion presupposed that Faulk would eventually be dealt. When that did not happen because the market just was not there, the Hurricanes entered the season with five top 4 defensemen and salaries to match. For the 2018-19 season it worked. The team did not yet need extra salary cap space, as it was barely above the salary cap minimum, and the depth proved to be a positive. But longer term, the math will not work. Raises for Sebastian Aho and Teuvo Teravainen will take the Hurricanes’ salary up a notch. The team still needs to add at least one goalie and might not get off as cheap as last summer. There are additional players who will be up...
Carolina Hurricanes fans’ guide to the NHL’s center stage and the coverage that comes with it

Carolina Hurricanes fans’ guide to the NHL’s center stage and the coverage that comes with it

The transition to a bigger North American stage and audience With Boston’s win over Columbus on Monday night, the Hurricanes lead up to the Eastern Conference Finals has officially begun. We are two game sevens out West away from having only four teams remaining in the NHL playoffs. There are exactly zero teams from Canada and really only Boston and possibly St. Louis and/or Colorado as traditional hockey markets. The result is that a mass of hockey media will descend on Raleigh over the next couple weeks both physically to attend Eastern Conference Finals games but maybe even more significantly attention-wise. The attention and presence that is on the way will generate a different environment and have both pros and cons. What follows is an attempt to help make some sense of that for the Caniac faithful.   The Caniac’s guide to optimal usage of hockey energy Since this has the potential to become long and ‘rambly’, let me be kind and put a couple key points right up front. First and foremost, everyone should be a Canes fan in the way that works best for them. That is the theme of what follows but importantly also applies to my well-intentioned opinions and advice. Encouraging, friendly input can be helpful, but at the end of the day, you should do your Hurricanes hockey fandom in your own way.  Second, our hockey team and our hockey community does not need to defend itself from some of the BS that gets spewed in our direction each and ever time the Hurricanes reach a level where those who normally do not care...