Hurricanes moves: Phil Di Giuseppe to waivers; Martin Necas and Haydn Fleury to Charlotte; Clark Bishop recalled

Hurricanes moves: Phil Di Giuseppe to waivers; Martin Necas and Haydn Fleury to Charlotte; Clark Bishop recalled

Upon returning to Raleigh today after a circuitous three-game road trip, the Hurricanes announced a series of moves. Phil Di Giuseppe was placed on waivers (which could clear him to go to the AHL). Martin Necas was sent to the Charlotte Checkers. Haydn Fleury was sent to the Charlotte Checkers. Clark Bishop was recalled from the Charlotte Checkers. Today’s Daily Cup of Joe breaks down the series of moves   Martin Necas sent to Charlotte In my game recap yesterday, I suggested that Necas could be headed for the AHL after the team’s return when I said: Lost in the fact that he scored was that Brind’Amour again went away from him pulling him off the power play and sitting him when he shuffled a bit. The result was a meager 6:43 of ice time. The goal makes things interesting, but part of me thinks the return home could see Necas head to Charlotte for at least a short stint of heavy minutes. Because Rod Brind’Amour consistently says that Necas is making progress whenever pressed on the subject and that is what the local media reports, Necas’ demotion seems to be a surprise for many in the local hockey community. But Brind’Amour’s comments on Necas just mean first of all is that he will not to take to the air waves to overly criticize a 19-year old still very much in the learning phase. Second, I think Brind’Amour’s comments are a sign of patience in the process just meaning that Necas is making progress in his own way. But awhile back now, I think it became incredibly clear that...
Early assessment of the Carolina Hurricanes newly-minted blue line

Early assessment of the Carolina Hurricanes newly-minted blue line

When the Hurricanes traded for Dougie Hamilton at the draft and then only days later added Calvin de Haan via free agency, the blue line instantly morphed from being a young, talented but unproven group into arguably the deepest proven blue line in the NHL. When the offseason full of Justin Faulk trade rumors ended with Faulk still wearing a Canes uniform seemingly because a fair deal could not be found, the group became even deeper. Now seven mostly successful games into the 2018-19 season, today’s Daily Cup of Joe offers an early assessment of the group.   In total In total, the quality and depth realized on paper during the offseason has also appeared on the ice. While I do not think the group has hit its ceiling, it is still a strength. For me, an imperfect but interesting read on the lineup occurs every evening around puck drop time around the league when Twitter fills up with lineups for games. What many other teams are icing for a second pairing is nothing close to what the Canes have. That positive gets amplified even more when I debate which of de Haan/Faulk or van Riemsdyk or Fleury/Pesce is in fact that team’s second pairing. De Haan/Faulk generally gets the minutes, but Brind’Amour has had stretches where he noticeably chooses to use Pesce’s pairing for the tougher defensive assignments when possible. On the ice, the returns have been positive too. The helter skelter ‘three on the forecheck no matter what’ style that leans deep into the offensive zone has been successful but also creates its share of tough situations...
Gm7 @Tam: Capitulation day for Canes special teams leads to 4-2 loss to the Lightning

Gm7 @Tam: Capitulation day for Canes special teams leads to 4-2 loss to the Lightning

On Tuesday night in Tampa, Florida, the Hurricanes closed out a circuitous and challenging three-game road trip with a 4-2 loss to the Tampa Bay Lightning. The loss finishes the trip with a somewhat disappointing but not catastrophic 1-2 mark. Playoff pace (95 points) is basically playing .500 hockey on the road and getting two-thirds of the points at home. So in that regard, the Hurricanes came up a point short. But in total, the trip was far more positive than negative. The Hurricanes were by far the better team in the first win in a dominant effort and were actually the better team by a decent margin in Winnipeg on Sunday despite losing. The Hurricanes did run out of gas on Tuesday at about the midway point, but even still, special teams sabotaged the effort as much as anything. Before the trip, I wrote an ominous article considering the challenges that could could lie ahead with the team’s style against good teams on the road. Despite the 1-2 mark, I actually think the team passed that test. Adjust to break even on special teams and the Hurricanes come out 3-0. Tuesday’s game started similar to the previous two though not to the same extreme. The Hurricanes were the better team out of the gate and their ‘forecheck to the point of overwhelming the opponent’ style was reasonable effective even if not dominant. The Hurricanes scored first when Sebastian Aho went full Harry Potter basically snatching an aerial clear out of mid-air. From there the puck went quickly to Teuvo Teravaining and then Micheal Ferland who deftly finished. But...
‘What I’m Watching’ — Gm7 @Tam: Canes first road trip wraps up with tough test against the Lightning

‘What I’m Watching’ — Gm7 @Tam: Canes first road trip wraps up with tough test against the Lightning

On Tuesday night in Tampa, Florida, the Hurricanes three-game road trip will wrap up with a challenging match up against the Tampa Bay Lightning who like Sunday’s opponent often come up in Stanley Cup conversations. But the Hurricanes are gradually building credibility that suggests their hot start is for real. The win in Minnesota to kick off the trip required late game heroics and an overtime game-winner, but if one digs deeper into the details, the Hurricanes were utterly dominant in that game if you just remove the special teams struggles. Then playing a back-to-back in Winnipeg on Sunday, the Hurricanes again mustered an impressive even if unsuccessful performance. The Canes ultimately fell by a goal (not counting the empty-netter) but again were the aggressor and the better team. Coming into the game after an 8-2 drubbing of the Columbus Blue Jackets, the Lightning represent a third consecutive test against a good hockey team.   ‘What I’m watching’ for the Carolina Hurricanes versus the Tampa Bay Lightning 1) Yet another run of Brind’Amour’s aggressive style against a good team One of my concerns heading into the road trip was how well the Hurricanes aggressive, ‘hound the puck everywhere/recover if needed’ style would work against strong offensive teams that can move the puck. So far, Brind’Amour’s approach has passed with flying colors. In Saturday’s win against the Wild, the Hurricanes swarmed, smothered and dominated. Minnesota did adjust somewhat as the game wore on but never really solved it. The Winnipeg game was not nearly as lopsided, but the Hurricanes did force their frenetic and sometimes chaotic style of play into...
Parallels between the 2005-06 and 2018-19 Carolina Hurricanes

Parallels between the 2005-06 and 2018-19 Carolina Hurricanes

First, let me be clear that I am not predicting another Stanley Cup Championship for the Carolina Hurricanes. But second, let me also be clear that the Hurricanes playoff runs that came out of nowhere in 2002, 2006 and to some degree 2009 prove that anything really is possible. That said, I do think there are a number of very interesting parallels between the two teams.   1) Low preseason expectations from the experts Coming off of a lockout in 2004-05, the Hurricanes were unanimously picked to finish in the bottom five or six teams in the league and only occasionally picked to finish four or five spots higher but still out of the playoff mix. Though expectations might be a tiny bit higher for the 2018-19 team, the prognosticators nearly unanimously have the Hurricanes landing well below the playoff cut line for the 2018-19 season.   2) A team with significant personnel changeover One of the things that made a surprise possible in 2005-06 was the fact that the roster was significantly different from the previous season and therefore difficult to project. If my math is right, the 2005-06 team had ten newcomers on the opening day roster. Trying to predict how well a team will do when half of it is new is difficult. Fast forward to the 2018-19 season and the Carolina Hurricanes have six newcomers but also four rookies who have played only a handful of NHL games and are more or less newcomers.   3) An aggressive, attacking style of play The trademark of the 2005-06 Hurricanes team was its attacking style. Coming out...